Brianne Connecting Through Tumblr

For my first year writing class, Writing111 Section L: Connecting Through New Media.

Twitter as a Connector

In a New York Times Magazine article (http://goo.gl/tEHfw), Bill Keller claims that there is “something illusory about the connectedness of Twitter”. However, in many online communities, such as the MBTI community, this connection is not illusory.  Twitter is the connection that the communities are based upon.  While Twitter serves many purposes, within the MBTI it primarily functions as a connector.

(Follow this link for another response to Bill Keller’s “The Twitter Trap” http://goo.gl/D3lVf)

 Twitter is a flexible tool that can be used for multiple purposes within virtual communities; Keller concedes that it is “a megaphone for promotion, a seine for information, a helpful organizing tool for everything from dog-lover meet-ups to revolutions”.  Salon Tech Tips (http://goo.gl/XvX2D) explains that Twitter’s purposes include networking, building traffic, business promotion, and social communication.

Twitter functions to fulfill these diverse purposes within the MBTI community. CPP, Inc. uses their Twitter accounts as a way to promote products, recruit practitioners, and share information about upcoming seminars and training sessions. Members of the MBTI community often use Twitter to share links to related blog posts and news articles.

While the MBTI community does take advantage of Twitter’s promotional and information sharing value, Twitter is most heavily relied upon as a connector. According to danah boyd (http://www.danah.org/), “Twitter – like many emergent genres of social media – is structured around networks of people interacting with people they know or find interesting” (http://goo.gl/hqb7g). It is a community link that allows users to follow other users with similar interests in order to form communities. Twitter also functions as a connector between the community members and the information they share. Pictures and links are easily embedded into tweets; they provide an easy connection between Twitter users and shared information.

Twitter strengthens the MBTI community by connecting members with each other. An obvious example of this is the way that it enables community members to follow the Twitter feeds of other members. Twitter also allows community members to easily interact and converse with the use of symbols like @ and RT. An example of this can be seen in the picture below.

The tweet above demonstrates communication between @thembti, @typetrainer, and @donnadunning through use of @ and RT.

Twitter also connects MBTI community members to outside information. By embedding links, as demonstrated in the tweet above, members of the MBTI community are able to easily connect fellow members with relevant outside information. Users can also connect to information through hashtags (#).  The original tweet above, written by @thembti, includes multiple hashtags: #ENFJs, #results, #talents, #MBTI, and #develop.  Popular hashtags within the MBTI community include #mbti and #myersbriggs.  These hashtags allow community members to easily find tweets within the community and make it easy for other interested Twitter users to become involved in their conversations.

The connectedness of Twitter is no illusion. In the MBTI community, Twitter’s key role is to link the members to each other and to outside information. Twitter allows companies like CAPT and CPP to communicate and share ideas with psychologists, educators, and other interested community members.

For further reading on the connectedness of Twitter… http://goo.gl/lz701, http://goo.gl/kV2ij, http://goo.gl/oUHUV

What examples have you found of Twitter’s connectedness?

What other purposes of Twitter have you seen within the the MBTI community?

What purposes do YOU fulfill on Twitter?

Responses can be tweeted to @briannefyw111

Out of curiosity, I decided to see what would come up if I did a Google Image search for “Mr. Splashy Pants”.  This is one of the interesting pictures that came up (originally from http://www.blog.thesietch.org).
We’ve learned that different search results will show up for everyone.  Does anyone get any different interesting pictures? 

Out of curiosity, I decided to see what would come up if I did a Google Image search for “Mr. Splashy Pants”.  This is one of the interesting pictures that came up (originally from http://www.blog.thesietch.org).

We’ve learned that different search results will show up for everyone.  Does anyone get any different interesting pictures? 

davidburlet:

briannefyw111:

MBTI Storify

I actually learned about the meyers-briggs test back in my high school AP psychology class and we even took the test to see what types we were (unfortunately i forgot mine). do you think that certain types of the meyer-briggs personalities are more likely to take the test/ more likely to talk about it? also i liked the little characters used to represent the personalities.

That’s a really interesting question.  I’m not MBTI expert, but I would guess that people with N and P components would be more likely to take the test, and people with E N and P components would be more likely to talk about it.  Most people with N and P types are generally described to be curious, which would probably play into it.  The extroversion component would probably make people more likely to share their interests and curiosities with larger groups of people.

kosmas111:

The MBTI sounds really interesting. I think I would like to take the test because of your presentation! Is there anywhere on the Internet it is available? Great presentation.

briannefyw111:

MBTI Storify

The actual test isn’t available online, but you can find a lot of tests meant simulate the actual test by doing a quick Google search.  If you’re interested in doing this, I would recommend taking tests from multiple sources in order to compare your results and get the most accurate results.  You can also read about the different characteristics afterwards and try to decide which fits you best then compare that to the results you recieve.

cmchurchill:

briannefyw111:

MBTI Storify

Nicely done! Do you think there is a good reason as to why we don’t study this at all in Psychology?

And for the twitter accounts… I know you kinda went over them before, but each one has a different agenda and audience, correct? 

The reason MBTI seems to be dismissed by many psychologists is because it doesn’t accurately predict behavior.  My argument would be that it doesn’t have to.  They are correct.  It’s difficult to PREDICT behavior based on the MBTI.  However, what you are able to do is gain a better understanding of yourself (your thought patterns, your past behavior, etc), which I personally think is just as important.  I also find it a lot more interesting from an introspective, reflective point of view.

It’s also good to mention that not all psychology texts/classes dismiss MBTI.  The psych class I took in high school focused on the MBTI during our personality unit, and a class on human behavior that I took at Wartburg College actually had us take the test and spent quite a while discussing the test and it’s implications.

As far as CPP’s different Twitter accounts, yes, they do have different agendas and audiences.  However, these agendas and audiences definitely overlap.  I would say that CPPInc is the most general.  While it shares the agendas of the other two accounts, it also includes information about job openings, etc at the company.  CPPEducation is in the middle.  It includes information applying both MBTI and the Strong Interest Inventory (both published by the site).  thembti would be the most specific because it focuses entirely on the MBTI, as it’s name would suggest.  People interested in MBTI, the Strong Interest Inventory, or CPP in general may follow one, two, or all three of the accounts.

Does that answer your questions?

(via cmchurchill-deactivated20120603)

mitchkampf:

heyimgeoff:

briannefyw111:

MBTI Storify

I find this personality tests and stuff interesting but don’t really fully believe any of them, I think decisions all really depends on the situation because I react differently to similar situations depending on context.  On a side note, mood rings and horoscopes are pure science and I base all my important life decisions on those. Just kidding, but seriously.

I thought the video you used to introduce us to the MBTI was really cool and helped explain it well. I also liked that the twitter account would give tips to different types occasionally. How do you think others interact with these accounts an the MBTI community?

Mitch - There’s a fairly large community that interacts with these accounts.  It’s made up of practitioners of the tests, personality psychologists interested in MBTI, and other interested members. They will often reference each other.  CPP will actually link to community members blogs about MBTI.  I could explain further (I do so in 5-7 pages in my academic essay).  If you’re interested in learning more (not necessarily 5-7 pages worth), it will be explained further in my final blog post.

heyimgeoff:

briannefyw111:

MBTI Storify

I find this personality tests and stuff interesting but don’t really fully believe any of them, I think decisions all really depends on the situation because I react differently to similar situations depending on context.  On a side note, mood rings and horoscopes are pure science and I base all my important life decisions on those. Just kidding, but seriously.

I actually agree with you.  It’s all extremely interesting, but it would be ridiculous to take the results as the absolute truth.  All four components are spectrums.  You aren’t introverted or extroverted, but you’re probably, IN GENERAL, more one than the other.  Especially for people close to the middle, this can change day to day or over time.  No one should be treating their results as lifetime guides or anything.  However, I have found that they’re helpful in explaining general differences between people (which is really what personality is all about).

For example, on the sensing verses intuition spectrum, people closer to the sensing side are generally much more concerned with details while people closer to the intuition side care more about large concepts and connections between them.  Conflicts can arise when two people from opposite sides of the spectrum try to schedule an event.  I had my graduation party with my best friend.  While my mom and I are more intuitive, she and her mom are closer to the sensing side.  They wanted to schedule out every single tiny detail of the party, which was a little overwhelming for my mom and I.  At the same time, I was talking about MBTI in one of my classes, and it was really interesting to be able to look at the situation in that context and explain the frustration.  It helped me to see the planning process from there point of view.

Obviously, I could talk about this forever, but I’ll stop going on about it.  I’m impressed if you even took the time to read all of that. haha.

briannefyw111:

MBTI Storify

Are you interested in psychology or just a big fan of the inventroy test? Good presentation.  I need to take the test again to remember which one I am.

Both! I’m really interested in psychology in general and a big fan of the MBTI. It’s really fun to get insights about yourself.

(via braden111)

a.m.p.: "New Looks"

pearsoam:

So most of you (if you check your email) have noticed the change in the appearance of google’s gmail. The emails are spaced further apart and the entire row of icons for deleting and moving things have different symbols. I also noticed that YouTube has made some appearance changes. The webpage is…

It’s interesting that you point out that the changes in Gmail and YouTube are similar.  A lot of people don’t realize that Youtube is actually owned by Google.  They may still have pretty different developers (that’s something that might be interesting to look into), but it may explain some of the similarities.

As for the changes themselves, websites are constantly changing.  For example, there is always a big controversy over Facebook changes.  ”New” and “different” is often hard to get used to.  However, I know that I personally MUCH prefer the current Facebook interface to the one from when I first started using Facebook (I don’t miss waiting for 1000000 apps to load while I was trying to visit someone’s profile).

All-Access Mom Storify

"Mommy bloggers" is a really fun social media topic, and it’s really cool that you could relate it to an issue that involves you/your mom, food safety.

I’d imagine this “All-Access Mom” program has been pretty successful for McDonalds Canada.  Why Canada? Do they have a more prominent “mommy blogger” community?  Do you think that the US McDonalds would consider doing something like this after seeing the success in Canada?

Another question that came to mind was do typical mommy bloggers make money off of ads on their blogs?  If not, is it because of some moral objection to the idea?  I realize that this might vary from blog to blog.  Are the All-Access Moms making any money from McDonalds?  That could make a difference in how objective people perceive their insights to be.

(Source: ahorner111)